Saturday, September 15, 2012

Personal Information Dissemination System

In August 2012, my edWeb.net webinar focused on building a library volunteer program. I talked about parents, teachers, students, outside community organizations, and collaborative partnerships with other libraries. Towards that end, I also mentioned productivity tools, including my personal information distribution system. Joyce Valenza is my guide on curation. When I have questions about curation tools, I go to her. What I want to discuss instead is how users can combine curation tools to streamline information organization. That's what the diagram below represents. Use hover function to read explanations. Click on icons to learn more about tools.

Untitled Document Workflow Twitter is one of the two chief places I collect information Beyond Twitter, I get most of my new learning from Google Reader, where I follow my favorite education and tech blogs I use Flipboard on my iPhone or iPad to read through most of my incoming Twitter and RSS feeds. It's very handy. From there I send items I want to review to Pocket (formerly ReadItLater). Or, if I already know I want to permanently archive something, I save it to Pearltrees. I use Pocket (formerly ReadItLater) as a triage station - decide what I want to keep and review Pearltrees is where I store what I will write or webinate about later. And yes, there's an app for that! My personal Pearltrees account Tweets, by or about me - including reTweets are archived in a Gmail folder If This Then That streamlines workflow by quietly doing your work for you. I created a recipe to send my Tweets to Gmail. I use the Gmail filter system to send my IFTTT messages straight to a folder, bypassing my inbox completely. I learned this from my friend Jeremy Angoff of OunceIT, in Boston. I think he learned it from Brad Ovenell Carter, author of A Stick in the Sand blog Filters are powerful inbox condensers Favorited Tweets are stored in Evernote - I use this less and less. I only use this when I am reading directly from Twitter. From Flipboard, I use Pocket or Pearltrees Favorited Tweets are stored in Evernote - I use this less and less. I only use this when I am reading directly from Twitter. From Flipboard, I use Pocket or Pearltrees. The problem with Evernote, is that it is not a great collaborative tool. It is great for personal archiving though. Again, If This Then That quietly sends all favorited Tweets to Evernote Again, If This Then That (IFTTT) quietly sends all starred Google Reader posts to Evernote. I only use this if I am working directly in Google Reader. I have a different strategy if reading RSS feeds in FlipBoard. Favorited RSS feeds are sent to IFTT, which sends them to My Diigo library My Google+ account If I Tweet or reTweet something, those messages are archived to my Gmail folder Scoop.It is another curation tool I like, but I prefer Pearltrees - It's faster and easier, and it is easier to reorganize. I mostly use Facebook if I want to share with students, but I have a lot of educator friends there too I often message students (and my daughter) with information that will appeal to them. Student mobile phone numbers are included in our school's Student Information System (SIS). We also use Remind101 to blast messages to students I haven't quite got the hang of this one yet, but I dabbled a bit with Twitter in the classroom Some folks are not ready for any incoming messages other than Gmail. So that's how I send information to...for example...my husband. Sometimes, I pause before deciding whether an item is Pearltree-worthy. In that case, I send it to Pocket to ponder, then move it on to Pearltrees Shannon Miller is using Symbaloo much better than I am so I am redirecting you to her post about it I have a blog post brewing about this one. It is a very interesting little social media start-up. Check it out! This is my favorite to do list manager. There is an app for it too, so you can sync all your devices to the same tool I am not suggesting I do this all the time, or even regularly. I fall way behind all the time. But it is a good system when I check my feeds. :-)

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